if this is an emergency, contact 911

Clear Creek County Advocates

CLEAR CREEK COUNTY ADVOCATES
PO Box 21
405 Argentine Street
Georgetown, CO 80444
303-679-2426 office
303-569-3126 hotline
303-679-2393 after hours, dispatch, ask for advocate on call

Joni Hargitt, Executive Director

FOR EMERGENCIES: PLEASE CALL 911

The Clear Creek County Advocates is a non-profit organization for victims of all violent crimes, especially for women, men, and children who are victims of domestic violence and want to end the abuse in their homes and in their relationships.

ADVOCATES PROVIDE:
  • 24-Hour Hotline (303-569-3126)
  • Crisis Intervention
  • Counseling Referrals
  • Shelter Referrals
  • Liaison to the Judicial System
MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the Clear Creek County Advocates is to provide assistance, support, and education to the community regarding issues of victimization and violence prevention.

WHERE TO GET INFORMATION ON OFFENDER CUSTODY STATUS

VINE is an automated system that notifies victims and other interested parties to register to be notified on any changes to an offender’s custody status by phone or email. Colorado VINE’s toll free number is 1-888-263-8463. Offenders can be searched for in Colorado by calling that number, or search on VINELink.com. For more information, click on the VineLINK logo below.

click to access VINELink.com

WHAT IS DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

Domestic violence is a crime. It is the physical harm, bodily injury, assault, or the infliction of fear or imminent physical harm, bodily injury or assault between household or family members.

Domestic violence occurs in a cycle. Battering is an intentional act used to gain power and control over the other person.

THE CYCLE OF VIOLENCE
  • Stage I – Tension Building
    Tension exists between the family members. It is displayed by the batterer becoming increasingly irritable, jealous, or threatening.
  • Stage II – Explosion
    The battering incident. The tension becomes unbearable and is uncontrollably discharged.
  • Stage III – The Honeymoon
    The batterer is extremely loving and apologetic. Gifts are often given along with promises that the abuse will never happen again. Then it begins again.

The precipitating factor is usually some event unrelated to the victim’s behavior.

The State of Colorado has a domestic violence law mandating physical arrest and formal charges for those who commit domestic violence.

Characteristics of the Batterer
  • Found in all socioeconomic, educational, ethnic, racial, and age groups.
  • Uses psychological, verbal, and physical abuse, including sexual abuse.
  • Emotionally dependent, subject to secret depression known only to family, low self esteem, insatiable ego, overwhelming need to be right.
  • Belief that forcible behavior is aimed at securing the family nucleus.
  • General history of abuse.
  • Believes victim is personal property or possession, is to blame for problems, is crazy or out of control, victim deserves abuse.
  • Limited tolerance for frustration, demonstrates anger but often masks it, explosive temper.
  • Alcohol or drugs are often involved.
Characteristics of the Victim
  • Found in all socioeconomic, educational, ethnic, racial, and age groups.
  • Is psychologically, verbally, and physically abused, and uses sex to establish intimacy.
  • Emotionally and economically dependent, subject to depression, home accidents, low self-esteem, and is unsure of own needs.
  • Belief that transient acceptance of violent behavior will ultimately lead to a long-term resolution of family problems.
  • Generational history of witnessing abuse in family and/or being used.
  • Complaint, helpless, powerless, and accepts all blame.
  • At high risk for secret use of alcohol and drugs.
  • Frequently wishes partner were dead and frequently contemplates suicide.
LETHALITY FACTORS

There are 5 leading factors causing death in a domestic violence situation. If all questions below have a “yes” answer, the victim is in real danger of being killed when or shortly after a violent dispute erupts.

  1. Has the suspect ever choked you or put their hands around your neck, threatening to choke you?
  2. Have children been present during this or other incidents of domestic abuse?
  3. Has the suspect ever threatened to hurt or kill you? Have they ever threatened to hurt or kill other family members? Have they ever threatened to hurt or kill themselves?
  4. Has the suspect ever violated a “No Contact” order or other court orders regarding custody or probation?
  5. Does the suspect have access to weapons? Have they ever used a weapon to threaten or hurt you?
SEX ASSAULT IS A CRIME!!
WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW:

Sexual Assault includes any unwanted sexual contact.

YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO:
  • Not to be told how to dress
  • Change your mind at any time
  • Be treated with respect at all times
YOU HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO:
  • Talk openly about your sexual expectations, wishes and intentions
  • Assert yourself by standing up for your rights
  • Take and equal role in your relationships
  • Reject sexual stereotypes that define women as passive, weak and irrational
YOU DO NOT HAVE THE RIGHT TO PRESSURE OR FORCE SOMEONE TO HAVE SEX EVEN IF:
  • You paid for dinner or a night out
  • You have had sex before
  • Your partner agrees to have sex then changes their mind
  • They dress provocatively, flirt or come on to you
  • You meet at a bar or hitchhiking
  • You think they want to have sex or want to be persuaded
WHAT TO DO IF YOU OR SOMEONE YOU KNOW HAS BEEN SEXUALLY ASSAULTED
  • Tell someone you trust. That could be a parent, teacher, friend or a rape crisis line
  • Report the rape – reporting is an important part of ending sexual violence
  • Go to a hospital – See a health care provider immediately for treatment of injuries and for tests. This can provide important medical evidence. Do not bathe before you go
  • Seek counseling – consult a trained rape crisis counselor, hospital, rape crisis center or mental health center